Author Topic: Are Oblivion and Skyrim deficient in Lore?  (Read 2669 times)

scourgicus

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Are Oblivion and Skyrim deficient in Lore?
« on: August 16, 2012, 12:59:07 PM »
Hail Esteemed Loremasters!  ::listens to the echoes in the empty halls of the Temple::

There has been a lot of talk in the TES sites about the superiority of MW's use of Lore as opposed to Oblivion and Skyrim.  While I won't deny that the latter games don't approach Lore quite as heavily (36 Lessons, Vivec as a self-aware NPC) I -would- argue they include Lore in more accessible ways.  The PCs converation with Paarthurnax viz. kalpas is a prime example.  While its tempting to think that Bethesda is "dumbing down" the games (something I hear a -lot- on the main TES forum) I would suggest Lore has always been below the surface - the only reason it seems more prevalent in MW is the easy accessibility of -some- of the Sermons (they are lying in the open in Temples etc).  In other words, Beth has always made the Loreseekers work hard, they're just making it harder.

Thoughts?

scourgicus

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Re: Are Oblivion and Skyrim deficient in Lore?
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2012, 01:41:39 PM »
Realized this should be in Lore.  Cross-posting as I don't know if there's a Moderator to move it.

Peloponnese

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Re: Are Oblivion and Skyrim deficient in Lore?
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2013, 12:32:00 AM »
I am one who believes that the lore of Oblivion and Skyrim is less enthralling. It's a symptom of the writing of the main quest; based on the plot as a whole, there was no real choice in the matter. Morrowind's plot specifically and purposely tied the current issue into an ancient event that had a number of sources and witnesses to record it. Oblivion, which focused on a current issue that was only vaguely connected to an ancient issue (and, most importantly, didn't require ancient knowledge to fix), could only attach ancient lore to the current setting through sidestories like Knights of the Nine. And Skyrim is no different, though seeking out an Elder Scroll to find the ancient knowledge necessary to defeat Alduin is at least an attempt to return to the connections that made Morrowind's plot shine.

Then there's the more recent history, which is itself lore. Morrowind and Skyrim do this equally well, in my opinion; Oblivion falls flat. In fact, the ready-made explanation for people to be trying to assassinate the emperor and his heirs (as given in Morrowind with the doppelganger theory) was scrapped in favor of the Mythic Dawn. There's really no recent history to speak of to set up Oblivion's plot, though the plots of the previous games are at least analyzed in some ways--certainly they're better analyzed than Skyrim analyzes the Oblivion Crisis. (The Imperial account of the Crisis is horribly written.)